CINEMA | FILM NOIR

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Original Artwork : £290.00

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CINEMA | FILM NOIR
Graphite and collage on plywood board
27” x 34”

Subject
Created for the ‘Cinema’ exhibition, due early 2019

Main Portrait
Lauren Bacall

Materials
Graphite on 130g Snowdon white cartridge paper
Hand made paper

Documents:
Title, Clarence M. Busch March 1929. Letter of complaint by a local citizen concerning the activities of Al Capone.
1930 Court summons for Al Capone
1933 New York Times cover story concerning the death of five gangsters in a gun battle on Oklahoma

Manuscripts:
symboltitle William Shaw 1930s. Three pages from a hand written manuscript by William Shaw, leader of the White Cap Gang in Indianapolis during the 1930s, detailing his relationship with the gangster John Dillinger.

Description

A York Art Fusion exhibition using the theme of films will be on display in cinemas from early 2019. Titled ‘Cinema’, three members of the group will interpret the theme in their own way and mine explores the nature of the genres that are used to categorise movies.

Although originally intended as a separate project I subsequently felt that the actors who bring the characters to life, and those characters themselves, are very much the spirit of the film, and so I’ve decided to create the work as part of the Spirits project.

While researching the subject of genres I felt that one, although now rarely used, seemed to be more than just a category defining the type of content and more a declaration of it’s style. Film noir frequently features gangsters although not neccessarily, and although when the term is mentioned it invariably brings to mind black and white movies this is not true of all the films that are considered to be film noir. It is about the emotional content, the feeling or mood. Rather than the type of story, it is about the spirit of the story.

First used in 1946 by the French film critic Nino Frank, classic film noir references are usually about American movies made during the 1940s and 50s. These would often feature crime dramas filmed in a distinctive low-key black and white style and a dark tone, hence the genre name.

An actress who did more than her fair share to popularise the genre was Lauren Bacall. Younger than she appeared (she was 20 when she made To Have and Have Not) Bacall was blessed with extraordinary good looks and exuded a confidence behind her years. Following the success of To Have and Have Not she appeared in noir classics such as The Big Sleep, Dark Passage and Key Largo.

Original Artwork : £290.00

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